The art of railway photography

FOLLOWING the demise of steam in 1968, railway photography entered something of a ‘dark age’ when many star names had put away their cameras, and publications often could not see beyond a standard front three-quarter view of an approaching train.

WHERRY DAWN: Low sun and misty fields combine to great effect as a Greater Anglia Class 156 heads towards Acle, Norfolk, with a Great Yarmouth to Norwich service on March 12, 2014. Steve Arthur
WHERRY DAWN: Low sun and misty fields combine to great effect as a Greater Anglia Class 156 heads towards Acle, Norfolk, with a Great Yarmouth to Norwich service on March 12, 2014. Steve Arthur

In an attempt to rectify this, the Phoenix Railway Photographic Circle was set up in 1970 by Wyn Hobson to show that images of modern traction could be every bit as creative as those of the most innovative steam photographers. Members aim to take railway photography beyond the confines of photographic records and into the realms of art.

Initially, portfolios of work were circulated amongst members by post. But in today’s digital age there is also an active website and Flickr group to showcase work and provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and criticism.

Membership of the group is by invitation, but more details can
be found at phoenix-rpc.co.uk.

Read more features, news, views and opinion in the December issue of RE

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